Snapdragon Blog

Snapdragon processors behind superior graphics and mobile gaming technology at GDC

Mar 19, 2014

Qualcomm products mentioned within this post are offered by Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

As mobile technology and use has grown at unprecedented rates across the globe, Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ processors have become a major force and a leader in graphics and mobile gaming technology. At this week’s Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco we’ll be showcasing some of the superior gaming experiences that Snapdragon processors enable, featured in many of the most popular top-tier smartphones and tablets.

Some of the highlights at our Snapdragon Booth (#106):

Adreno™ 400 series: See the unmatched graphics performance of the new Adreno 420 GPU in the Snapdragon 805 processor. Not just mind-blowing performance, but sophisticated features like dynamic hardware tessellation and displacement mapping are now possible on tablets and smartphone, thanks to the powerful and efficient Adreno 400 series GPU.

Unreal Engine 4Unreal Engine 4 is Epic’s breakthrough game engine technology designed to power the next generation of games. UE4 pushes the limits of graphics and gaming to an unprecedented level and Snapdragon processors are up to that challenge. You don’t even have to wait to see the latest UE4 demos running on a commercially available device – they’re in action now on the popular Google Nexus 5 smartphone, powered by the Snapdragon 800 processor. You can also view a demo here:

Gaming at 4K Ultra HD: 4K Ultra HD, the next revolution in home video is coming, and coming fast. Think you're not ready? Think systems aren't ready yet either? Think again. See some of today's most popular games running at 4K on Snapdragon 805 tablets. See the first tablets with 4K internal displays and the ability to drive 4K over HDMI as well.

Qualcomm Vuforia™ SmartTerrain: Great games are immersive, drawing the user into the world of the game. But what if you could pull in more than just the user’s imagination? What if you could bring in parts of their world? Now you can, with Vuforia SmartTerrain. This amazing technology allows you to quickly create 3D models within just a few seconds, and then incorporate these into your game.

Collaboration Area: Want to learn more? Got a chunk of code you want talk about? Stop by the collaboration area under the big screen to ask the experts. The collaboration area is staffed by subject matter experts in Adreno tools, Vuforia, Qualcomm Developer Network, and more. Pull up a chair, and let's sit down together and take a look.

Innovation Sessions: Qualcomm Technologies invites you to join us for some informal technical sessions in the collaboration area on topics ranging from the dynamic hardware tessellation of Adreno 420 to a "pre-mortem" on a brand new Unity-based game from Fenix Fire.

Device Bar: Snapdragon processors power more than 1,350 Android and Windows Phone phones and tablets worldwide. We’ll showcase some of the latest high-end gaming devices, including:

For more information on the integrated Adreno GPU in Snapdragon processors, designed to deliver superior mobile gaming experiences, visit our GPU and SnapdragonGaming.com pages.

Jim Merrick

Marketing Director, IoT

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