Snapdragon Blog

Snapdragon powered Sony Xperia Z comes to T-Mobile

Jun 18, 2013

Qualcomm products mentioned within this post are offered by Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Sony Xperia Z

If you spend a lot of time gazing at your phone, set your sights on the Sony Xperia™ Z. Initially announced at CES 2013, and already released and widely popular outside the US, Sony announced today that T-Mobile will be the exclusive US carrier to bring the phone to eager fans.

Sony proclaims the Xperia Z to have the world's sharpest 5-inch display and includes BRAVIA® Engine 2 technology that automatically optimizes images so they're sharper and brighter. The 1080 x 1920 full HD Reality Display delivers great readability even in bright sunlight. It also delivers beautiful stills and movies against strong light, with its image sensor with HDR video.

Powered by the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ S4 Pro mobile processor, the Xperia Z is designed to let you run multiple apps at the same time, surf the web with less loading time and stream videos without stopping. Because the processor is asynchronous, powering up each core up and down independently, the Xperia Z stays charged longer by only using the precise amount of power when you need it without wasting power when you don't.

If you love the water, or tend to accidentally drop things in it, the Xperia Z boasts the highest level of water resistance available in a smartphone. To earn that rating Sony had to ensure the Xperia Z could be submerged up to 3 feet in water for 30 minutes and come out good as new. Dust resistant and made with the same material used as a metal substitute in automobile parts, this smartphone is strong stuff.

T-Mobile says the Xperia Z's arrival is imminent, and you can sign up to be among the first to know.

Early reviews:

  • Tech Radar: "The Xperia Z is a phone that's got us fired up about Sony mobile again."
  • Engadget: "Once you get to look at the phone in person, all Xperias that came before it pale in comparison."
  • cnet"The Sony Xperia Z is the latest entry in the Japanese company's burgeoning range of Android smart phones and comes with the kind of specifications that dedicated mobile geeks stay up all night dreaming of."

Nattida Samanukorn

Staff Writer, Snapdragon Blog

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Snapdragon Wear 2100 powers high-end fashion smartwatches at Baselworld

Silicon Valley met Switzerland at this year’s Baselworld, the world’s premier event for the watch and jewelry industry, which celebrated its 100th anniversary this year. Several impressive smartwatches made their debut, all touting the Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 Platform and all powered by Android Wear 2.0. With this reliable platform and OS developed specifically for wearables, it’s no wonder high-end brands are looking beyond basic wearable functions, and combining style with technology to develop chic smartwatches fit for any lifestyle.

The superior SoC for smartwatches, Snapdragon Wear 2100, is an integrated, ultra-low power sensor hub. It’s 30 percent smaller than previous-generation wearable SoCs, allowing OEMs the freedom to develop thinner, sleeker product designs. And because it uses 25 percent less power than its older sibling (the Snapdragon 400), watchmakers can offer even more features and better designs.

The Snapdragon Wear 2100 comes in both tethered (Bluetooth and Wi-Fi) and connected (3G and 4G LTE) versions. The latter allows wearers to do more with their wearables, from streaming music to sending messages to calling a cab, in tandem with — or even without — having to bring their smartphones along.

Each of the touchscreen smartwatches included in this roundup run Android Wear 2.0, Google’s latest wearable operating system, and can pair with both iOS and Android phones. With Android Wear 2.0, users can personalize their watch faces with chronometer-style complications and create shortcuts to their favorite applications. In addition to the pre-installed Google Fit and calendar apps, more apps can be downloaded directly through the on-watch Google Play store, so wearers can customize their device to their lifestyle.

Android Wear 2.0 brings the Google Assistant to your wrist. Find answers and get things done even when your hands are full. Reply to a friend, set a reminder, or ask for directions. Just hold the power button or say “OK Google”.

Check out the some of Snapdragon Wear powered smartwatches that made a splash at this year’s Baselworld:

Apr 18, 2017

Snapdragon

Powered by Snapdragon 835, Sony's Xperia XZ Premium reaches Gigabit speeds

World, meet the first commercial smartphone powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor: Sony’s Xperia XZ Premium. Making its debut at this year’s Mobile World Congress, the latest Sony smartphone boasts advanced camera functionality with its new Motion Eye camera, a vivid 4K HDR display, and Gigabit-class LTE speeds (one of the first to do so) — all welcome advancements to power users as we forge ahead to 5G.

Forming lasting connections

Engineered to provide phenomenal mobile performance, the Xperia XZ Premium’s Snapdragon 835 processor packs a punch. At 10 nanometers, the processor is 35 percent smaller and uses 25 percent less power than previous Snapdragon designs. It’s also significantly smaller than its 14nm predecessor, which means there’s more room for the phone’s many innovative features.

A highlight of the Snapdragon 835 is its Qualcomm Snapdragon X16 LTE modem, which is designed to support Gigabit-class speeds to those on the go. Blurring the line between wireless and wired broadband, the X16 can achieve peak download speeds up to 10X as fast as first generation 4G LTE devices — at up to 1Gbps, that is. To reach these unprecedented speeds, the modem supports 4x4 MIMO and 4x carrier aggregation, so access to a network and speed — even in weak signal conditions — are rarely a concern.

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Feb 28, 2017

Snapdragon

Snapdragon 820 powered LG V20 is a multimedia heavyweight

We expect our smartphones to do a lot at once. We ask them to zing messages back and forth, stream the latest binge-worthy TV show, play the morning pump-up song, and notify us when the bus is five minutes away—all without depleting the charge we need to make it through the day. The problem is that some phones can only perform a few of these tasks at once, and most cannot multi-task in a power-efficient manner.

Powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 processor, the LG V20, the latest in its V series of smartphones, intends to buck that trend. It’s engineered to harness the strength and finesse of its revolutionary processor to deliver immersive multimedia and gaming, ingenious productivity settings, and the intelligent power efficiency to make it all possible.

Oh, and did we mention that the V20 is making history? It’s the first smartphone to come preloaded with both of Android’s highly anticipated technologies—7.0 Nougat operating system and Google’s In Apps phone search—out of the box. With In Apps, a breakthrough intelligent search tool, you can find content from both built-in apps (like contacts, emails, text messages, and photos), as well as from user-installed apps. It also enables you to discover recently accessed apps, people to get in touch with, messages to read, or activity across apps, without having to type a query. Additionally, Nougat allows you to see two apps at once in a split screen and drag text, images, and files from one app to another for optimal multitasking.

The LG V20 offers leading connectivity with the 820’s integrated Snapdragon X12 LTE modem, which is a great fit for those who are always connected. It can support download speeds up to an incredible 600Mbps (perfect for streaming 360-degree VR videos), fast access to files in cloud storage, and quick downloads of high quality music for on-device or offline playback.

Sep 6, 2016
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Qualcomm builds momentum in China with Oppo licensing agreement

When it comes to how we connect, Qualcomm is committed to bringing the future forward faster, particularly through wireless connectivity. On the heels of recent agreements with Chinese electronic giants like Lenovo, Xiaomi and Haier, we are pleased to have reached a new patent licensing agreement with Oppo.

The agreement enables Oppo to develop and manufacture mobile devices with 3G and 4G LTE capabilities in China. Currently, more than 100 Chinese companies have signed license agreements with Qualcomm that are consistent with terms of the rectification plan submitted by Qualcomm to, and accepted by the NDRC.

The new agreement provides another step forward for Qualcomm to expand its licensing business in China—and to continue developing the connectivity fabric of everything on a global scale.

“Qualcomm is very pleased to sign a license agreement with OPPO,” said Alex Rogers, senior vice president and general manager, Qualcomm Technology Licensing. “As an R&D engine for the industry, we are excited to see companies such as OPPO build on our patented technologies to drive further development and innovation and create compelling products."

According to IDC (July 2016), Oppo is the 2nd largest manufacturer of mobile electronic devices in China for the first half of 2016 and a top-10 global electronics player.

Aug 1, 2016

Spark

Back out of whack? How to fix text neck

Brett Sears is a practicing physical therapist, who specializes in treating back and neck pain. He is the Physical Therapy Expert at Verywell.com, and writes about how new technology can help people move and feel better. The views expressed are the author’s own, and do not necessarily represent the views of Qualcomm. 

I see it every day and everywhere: People tenaciously tapping away at smartphones, laptops, and tablets. There they are, slouched on the comfy couch at the coffee shop or standing in line at the bank, noses down in their devices. It’s our universal posture. 

It’s also a posture that’s causing our health to suffer. Looking down at our devices increases stress on our spines and the small, spongy discs between vertebrae. In fact, research indicates that the further you bend your neck, the greater the torque on your spine; a forward angle of 60 degrees — that is, looking straight down at a phone held at chest level — makes a 12-pound head feel like it weighs 60 pounds. This heavy-head phenomenon can cause pain due to pinched nerves or herniated discs.

As a physical therapist, I treat people with these aches and pains every day. Thankfully, unlike many nondescript backaches, we know what’s causing our “text neck,” which means we’re better equipped to fix it. So, what do we do now? Throw away the technology? Of course not. We just need to be more aware of our interactions with it. 

That awareness starts with learning proper posture. Years ago, the great physical therapist and spine guru Robin McKenzie was asked about the three most important treatment techniques he could offer a patient. His response: "Posture correction, posture correction, and posture correction." Proper posture involves maintaining the natural anatomical position of your spine —  ears over shoulders, shoulders over your hips, and a slight forward curve in the neck and lower back. 

Positive change in your positioning while tweeting or emailing means keeping your eyes and head above your shoulders. Sometimes simple fixes can do a lot of good, too; for instance, adding a lumbar support roll to your chair can brace your spine, and using a small stand can elevate your laptop to eye level. (Important caveat here: If you’re experiencing persistent spinal pain or discomfort, see your doctor or a physical therapist. Don't let small aches and pains turn into big problems.) 

Ironically, technology itself can also help make us more aware of — even eliminate — our slouches and slumps. Wearable devices can train you to sit and stand with correct posture. The Lumo Lift, for example, is a small magnetic chip that attaches to a shirt or bra strap and vibrates whenever you slouch. The TruPosture smart shirt has five sensors placed along your spine, which signal haptic feedback whenever your posture is less than ideal.

We also need to realize that our desks, chairs, and makeshift mobile “workstations” aren’t doing our backs any favors, either. As physical therapists like to say, “motion is lotion.” So, recent controversies notwithstanding, a sit-to-stand workstation, such as the Varidesk height-adjustable standing desk, may be your best bet to stave off laptop-induced “tech” neck. Sit a little, stand a bit, and recline some. Similarly, the Gesture Chair by Steelcase includes a flexible back and articulating arms that move with you, providing support for your spine as you recline and for your elbows and shoulders as you hold up mobile devices.

All of these efforts boil down to the same idea: We’ll fend off pain if we manage to keep our screens at eye level. Eventually, changes in the devices themselves will make that easier to do. The newest wave of wearable, head-mounted displays (HMDs), similar to Glyph, put screens right in front of our faces, saving us from craning and bending forward. Unfortunately, HMDs have yet to infiltrate our daily lives (sorry, Google Glass). Until eyeglasses — or perhaps contact lenses one day — become screens, we’ll need to put a little effort into making certain our gadgets don’t become pains in the neck.

Jun 16, 2016